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Lectures and workshops

The lectures and workshops take place in the Medientheater and in Room 0.12 resp. in the Signallabor. See the floor plan for directions.

Sunday, 2nd of October
TimeLectures in the MedientheaterLectures in Room 0.12Workshops in the Signallabor
09:30 - 10:00Opening Event
Dr. Stefan Höltgen
10:00 - 11:30Symposium "Hello, I'm ELIZA."Speichermonster – "Virtuelle" Adressierung für 8-Bit-Rechner
Hans Franke

11:30 - 13:00Spracherkennung mit dem Z9001
Volker Pohlers
13:00 - 14:00Lunch break
14:00 - 15:30Symposium "Hello, I'm ELIZA."Die Entwicklung des ersten Mephisto-Schachcomputers
Thomas Nitsche

15:30 - 17:00Defining Supercomputing – Seymour Cray und die CDC 6600
Wolfgang Stief
17:00 - 18:30Spielentwicklung in 6502-Assembler für 8-Bit-Heimcomputer
Thomas Schulz
18:30 - 19:00Fucked Up For A Cause – Why the Atari 2600 VCS is this way
Sven Oliver Moll
19:00 - 20:00


Monday, 3rd of October
TimeLectures in the MedientheaterWorkshops in the Signallabor
10:00 - 11:30Jonathan – Eine ganz persönliche Geschichte des Mac-Plus-Klons aus Taiwan
Benjamin Heidersberger

11:30 - 13:00"Hello world!" vor 25 Jahren
Martin Neitzel
13:00 - 14:00Lunch break
14:00 - 15:30Die inneren Werte zählen – Perspektiven- und Paradigmenwechsel beim Übergang von Hoch- zu Maschinensprache
Dr. Frederik Holst

15:30 - 17:00SHRDLU
Herbert Lange
17:00 - 17:30Closing Event
Sebastian Fischer, Anke Stüber, Eva Kudrass

More information about lectures and workshops is available in German.

SHRDLU

SHRDLU is a computer program developed around 1970 by Terry Winograd at the MIT AI Labs. Similar to ELIZA, which was developed at the same place a few years earlier, the user can talk to the program. But other than with ELIZA, with which basically a "conversation" about any topic is possible, the only possible topic with SHRDLU is a world of colourful toy blocks. SHRDLU cannot only give information about its virtual world but also change it according to commands of the user. This talk gives not only a historical overview of this surprising piece of software but also presents a glimpse under the surface to show how a program can seemingly understand natural language more than 40 years before the invention of Siri. Herbert Lange